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Project Interdependency – CV tips

As  part of the CV Tips series I wanted to address project interdependency, it is an important factor to cover in the CV if you have had exposure to it as there is a big difference in portfolios which have dependencies to ones which are not interlinked. In basic terms Project Interdependency is a term often used where two or more projects relate in particular ways – for example if one of the projects fails to deliver expected results/benefits then all other related projects will be affected somehow. This can be resource conflicts, cost (if there is an overspend and a bunch of projects share this then other projects can fall short of funds), a project may be dependent on another project starting or meeting certain deliverables by milestones. Because of these reasons project interdependency is seen as a major risk to the other affected/related projects – if one project fails, then the rest can all come to a halt or fail also.

Project Interdependency

Now we have cleared up what a project interdependency is, you can see why this is a great competency to add into the CV if you have been managing/supporting this – the role of a PM always involves a certain level of balancing various teams and groups, ensuring all is being completed and delivered to plan, but when it comes to project interdependency there is a high emphasis on bringing together all parties to ensure success. Although there is the administrative element, there is also the all important governance, relationship building, team leading, negotiating with suppliers and a spectrum of other skills all rolled into one.

I think you will agree the competency is worthy of a bullet point on the CV, again, good examples may warrant being placed in the key achievements and of course you should look to add into the description of the portfolio when talking through volume of projects, programmes, etc.

Project Management Careers – Embracing Change

As a project professional you are used to getting others to embrace change, however, have you ever analysed your own viewpoint of change? We have all been guilty of digging our heels in when someone wants us to change something, whether it is your favourite bag or the colour of your lounge. Naturally we start to feel threatened by being told that things look tired or aren’t right. The same happens when you are looking to apply for a new job, there’s the whole change of company, environment, culture and how we do things which come into play but before we even reach that point we need to address actually securing interviews and the job. This can be terrifying for some who have perhaps been working in a business for years and have been made redundant but also for those who recognise they need to make a move for whatever reason. Applying for jobs has changed over the years and suddenly what was always an effective way of securing a new role is now dated and requires some work.

Your CV is the most important starting point for job applications – employers have become fussy and as the shift in lower salaries through perception of a buyers’ market has moved on, the salaries are certainly reaching a more commensurate level but employers expect to see excellence for the price. I know you will be sat there thinking, my CV is fine, it has always secured me interviews in the past so what next. But have you tested it in the market? Had many calls or much interest? If not, then maybe you need to address why!

Change is good

Resistance to change is common as you well know and some of the reasons are below:

  • Comfort zone – it is scary to move out of your comfort zone but it is also healthy to do so as much as possible and addressing your career goals / approach to securing a new role is important. Explore new avenues.
  • It worked before – yes but times change, as do expectations.
  • Uncertainty – research, there’s plenty of help out there which is free to access. Talk to people; find out how they do it.
  • Am I really good enough – easy to lose confidence when you have been struggling to secure interviews for a while or been made redundant, work at understanding your skill-set by performing a skills audit.
  • Loss of control – by embracing the change you will soon gain control, careers coaching can be a great way to understand how to make a positive move forward.

Do not assume because your CV reads fine to you, that it is good enough to whet the appetites of employers – ask for feedback from peers, recruiters, and specialists in the field. All feedback is good feedback; don’t be disheartened if you hear something you don’t want to. Be thankful it has been highlighted and address it constructively; ask for advice or for more clarity.

Free Project Management CV Health check

When was the last time you went to the doctors? A while ago I am sure, but you know you should have regular checks even though you feel as though you are working as you should. The same goes for your CV, whether you are looking for work or not, you need to ensure your CV is in tip top condition so it can perform to its optimum.

The CV Righter offers a free Project Management CV health check for all UK professionals – send your CV in and let us perform a thorough review and let you know where the weaknesses and strengths are. We offer a constructive solution and remedy for any CV under-performing and ensure you understand why it isn’t working; equally if you have a good strong CV we tell you.

doctor

Don’t let yourself down by assuming your CV sells you and pitches you at the right level, ensure it can put you in the shortlist for your ideal role.

Is my project manager CV helping me get a positive response? PM Q&A

“As a senior project manager with experience of working on some high profile projects with large names in financial services I have been applying for a number of project management jobs recently and had a few calls but still no interviews – what am I doing wrong? I am clearly attracting some interest but not a lot and I don’t seem to be getting further that the initial recruiter call and promise of being put forward to the client.” John Senior PM London

Help

Without looking at your CV it is hard to say but I can make an educated guess at where you are going wrong John – for a start, the fact you have worked on high profile projects for reputable businesses will always attract some interest from recruiters. However the experience alone won’t cut it with the employers and this part is the most frustrating for the recruiters, your CV clearly isn’t selling you positively so the recruiters are taking a punt by putting you forward for roles but you are being rejected against your peers who have a much stronger CV.

Be sure to tell us about the projects – what was involved and what they achieved but don’t write an essay, keep it clear and concise (we don’t need to know sq ft just general scale). Then tell us how you work – think about the job description, it should contain a list of wants, are you addressing these wants on your CV?? And not just a list of skills, use the space to talk through context so we know exactly who, how, when, why etc. Do not assume the reviewer will know you work in a particular way, having the PM badges doesn’t excuse you from talking about method in your CV.