Archive For February 16, 2018

Project Interdependency – CV tips

As  part of the CV Tips series I wanted to address project interdependency, it is an important factor to cover in the CV if you have had exposure to it as there is a big difference in portfolios which have dependencies to ones which are not interlinked. In basic terms Project Interdependency is a term often used where two or more projects relate in particular ways – for example if one of the projects fails to deliver expected results/benefits then all other related projects will be affected somehow. This can be resource conflicts, cost (if there is an overspend and a bunch of projects share this then other projects can fall short of funds), a project may be dependent on another project starting or meeting certain deliverables by milestones. Because of these reasons project interdependency is seen as a major risk to the other affected/related projects – if one project fails, then the rest can all come to a halt or fail also.

Project Interdependency

Now we have cleared up what a project interdependency is, you can see why this is a great competency to add into the CV if you have been managing/supporting this – the role of a PM always involves a certain level of balancing various teams and groups, ensuring all is being completed and delivered to plan, but when it comes to project interdependency there is a high emphasis on bringing together all parties to ensure success. Although there is the administrative element, there is also the all important governance, relationship building, team leading, negotiating with suppliers and a spectrum of other skills all rolled into one.

I think you will agree the competency is worthy of a bullet point on the CV, again, good examples may warrant being placed in the key achievements and of course you should look to add into the description of the portfolio when talking through volume of projects, programmes, etc.

Relationship Management – PM Tips

A key skill within project management is effective relationship management; I know some exceptional communicators and also know some who think they are exceptional communicators – unfortunately it is difficult to break through a hardened ego shell so this article is aimed at those who remain open minded to improving or honing their skill. Behaviours play a big part of relationship management and building – gaining respect doesn’t purely come from a shining track record of stellar delivery, it comes from a few factors:

  1. Respecting others – show interest in individuals and understand what their drivers are, listen to them and hold on to the information.
  2. Be genuine – we are all human, admit your mistakes and set your limits.
  3. Support others awareness of you, share interests and values.
  4. Demonstrate integrity – practice what you preach, roll your sleeves up and work with others.


Connect with others by listening, create a positive environment where you demonstrate a personal investment in the relationship, apply appropriate boundaries and gain a clear sense of what individuals are saying, build rapport and encourage others to listen in return.

When in a scenario you should look to apply the following:

  • Acknowledge what is being said, register what is happening.
  • Identify their intentions – what is it they hope to achieve.
  • Review – consider the conversation and either respond there or give a time when you will be able to provide a response.

Always ensure conversations have a healthy balance of input and response, listen, offer support or solutions, listen, confirm understanding, listen, reflect and summarise. Make observations; provide feedback and/or opinions, challenge views, offer relevant examples/stories and advice. Don’t talk over others – let them have their say, but keep in control of the discussion.