Archive for the ‘Business Networking’ Category:

How to increase your network – PM CV Tips

So you’ve created the perfect CV and have been applying for roles only to find a lot of them seem to be put on hold or aren’t quite the opportunity advertised, what else can you be doing to ensure you aren’t missing out on jobs. There are a high percentage of roles which aren’t actually advertised; therefore you need to be doing more than just applying for advertised roles.

Here’s a list of areas which should be on your to do list:

  • LinkedIn – employers are increasingly using this business networking site to find fresh talent, avoiding recruitment costs they are making contact with individuals who look like a good fit to the team. Make sure your profile is up to date and not just a carbon copy of your CV, add in some interesting pieces of information which will draw in attention. Also make sure you join some groups and join in the forums, you’ll be surprised how this actually opens doors for you. Not only will you be making new contacts, you might just gain attention from hiring managers looking for solutions to their issues.
  • Twitter – I know this may feel like a daunting thing for some but twitter is fast becoming the place for networking, there is a strong PM network which can really give you a heads up to current practices, PM needs and building your network.
  • Personal network – put the word about that you are available, people like nothing more than to help each other and you might just find you are being recommended for pieces of work or at the very least, being made aware of roles coming up which have yet to be advertised.
  • Events – there’s a fair few free events across the country, even those run by APM have a low fee for their branch events. Meeting other professionals in the field and learning something too – what’s not good about that?
  • Agencies – register with relevant agencies and try to make contact with a recruiter to get in their heads, make sure you know what you want to discuss and make a good impression. Databases are vast so it is ideal to be speaking with someone and keeping in regular contact to ensure they are keeping you in mind when new roles come in.

Groups

Make an effort to do more than just apply for roles online, demonstrate your tenacity, motivation and professionalism by taking extra steps to secure that next role.

The Rise Of The Female Tech Entrepreneur

Women have always appeared in the Fortune 500 rich list here and there, but it’s only recently that their roles have become newsworthy – mainly thanks to two powerful women taking top jobs at the world’s biggest tech brands. As these companies become more powerful on a global scale, the actions of their CEOs come under scrutiny on a daily basis; if the CEO happens to be female, you can practically guarantee a news story will follow.

In this article, we’ll look at four female entrepreneurs that have climbed the ranks to positions of power.

First, there’s Sheryl Sandberg, the woman who assists CEO Mark Zuckerberg at Facebook. Sandberg is an ex-US government employee and was previously a high flyer at Google before becoming the first woman on Facebook’s board. Her official title is chief operating officer, and she appears regularly in the press.

Women in BusinessSandberg is a vocal believer in women’s ability to graduate towards senior roles in business, and her book Lean In is dedicated to discussing the topic. She extensively analyses the possible reasons for women holding back in the workplace. She also believes women should be comfortable in their own skin, particularly in a corporate environment, and is keen to promote equality at work and in the home.

Ursula Burns has served exactly three years as CEO of Xerox and has been tasked with the modernisation of the brand – no mean feat for a company that was founded more than a century ago. Her appointment is notable in the US: she was the first ever woman of colour to be in charge of an enterprise as massive as Xerox, and she is in the top 20 most powerful women on the planet.

On the company’s homepage, Burns says she values “ethical business practices”, and openly criticises organisations she believes to be sexist or discriminatory. It is estimated that she earned a cool $9.9 million last year, and her 2011 salary was comparable.

Marissa Meyer is perhaps the best-known example of a female CEO hitting the headlines. Now in charge of Yahoo!, Meyer started her working life at Google when the company was just starting out. Her speciality was A.I., and she quickly rose through the ranks to become Vice President of Search Products and User Experience.

Since 2012, Meyer has lead Yahoo! through a turbulent transition period. Rejecting extensive maternity leave, Meyer has banned employees from home working, although she herself worked from home towards the end of her pregnancy and paid to have a nursery built next to her corporate office. Despite ruffling feathers, she is determined to forge ahead with major changes.

With a background working in top jobs for The Walt Disney Company and eBay, and holding qualifications from Princeton and Harvard, Meg Whitman was well-placed to become CEO of Hewlett-Packard. Overall, Whitman is thought to be worth $1.3 billion; she spent $144 million on her campaign to become Governor of California three years ago. She lost.

Whitman has worked with some of the biggest names in the US, counting Steve Ballmer and Mitt Romney among former colleagues. At eBay, she was criticised for purchasing Skype, but that didn’t prevent HP from poaching her in 2011. Whitman is perhaps the most established high-profile CEO in the Fortune 500 list.

Sam Wright is a freelance writer working with prweekjobs.co.uk.

How to Network at Conferences

Attending conferences is a great way to stay current with the latest happenings in your industry. While internet research and discussions with partners and suppliers can be beneficial, there is nothing quite like joining a large group of professionals in your field.

Presentations by experts may be infrequent in your area, but at a conference you’ll have access to a vast wealth of knowledge and experience.

Conferences are also great places to be inspired- the simple act of leaving, for example, your cheap wholesale products warehouse, and travelling to meet with others who have done the same can provide you with a grand new perspective.

You will also be in a position to connect with many potential partners in business, as well as collaborators, suppliers and, most importantly, new clients.

However, going to a conference and attending seminars is not enough. In order to make the most of the experience you’ve got to network and make the rounds. So how does one meet new people and forge the right connections at one of these events?

Before the Conference

Try to define your goals for this event. Instead of just having a vague idea that you’ll be going to learn new things about selling cheap wholesale products and maybe meet a few people, make it your mission to connect directly with potential business partners and clients in your industry.

Connect with other conference goers and presenters as much as possible. See if your conference has a hash tag to follow on Twitter, or an official Facebook page. Contact speakers on their websites and let them know that you are looking forward to their seminar.

Networking

Carefully review the conference agenda and plan to attend the seminars and workshops that specifically apply to your industry and goals.

Prepare your response to the question “What do you do?”  Instead of simply responding that you buy cheap wholesale products and then sell them, have a thorough but concise explanation of what your line of work is and who your clients are. You may also want to add information about your goals for the event.

During the Conference

As you attend each seminar (as many as possible), be ready to meet people. Have business cards with your up-to-date contact information and photo on them and be ready to hand them out. If you’re not comfortable giving out business cards, practise with a family member or friend prior to the event.

It is also a good idea to plan several conversation starters or phrases to continue conversations, so that your interactions don’t fizzle out after small talk. Be ready to ask questions about others and then confidently share information about what you do and what you have to offer.

After the Conference

Go through the business cards you receive and connect with the appropriate people. Very important connections may warrant a phone call, while others may do best with an email or friend request on social media. Plan to stay in touch, and be sure your connections know where to find you if necessary.

This article was contributed by Wholesale Clearance in the UK.

Is your LinkedIn profile good enough for business?

I have been using LinkedIn for a number of years now, at first it was often used as business contact facility but over the years it has transformed to a recruitment tool for agencies and employers and very much the B2B networking and marketing tool.

As such I have been quite intrigued by some profiles as I skip through the site from time to time to see what people are up to and read through suggested links etc. intrigued and disappointed. If I have been talking with one of my contacts and asked if they could suggest someone who could do XYZ they are always very good at passing on their experiences and more importantly their contacts. At the end of the day word of mouth really is a key driver certainly for small businesses but also with the larger names. But if you are like me, when it is suggested you use a particular business or contact then you research them first. I always check out what people are saying about them but also look them up on LinkedIn and I find it so disappointing when the profile is limited, often just stating the dates and company name and maybe a job title. There is no real meat for the viewer; in fact there is little point to there actually having a profile. I like to see recommendations from clients’, peers, line managers etc. I also like to see what it is you do in your role and if you are a small business director – what is it your business does? What projects have you worked on? Who are your clients’?

As part of an expansion to our services at The CV Righter – we are now undertaking business services such as writing content for LinkedIn profiles, and we feel that you cannot afford not to address such an important part of creating the right image for your business.

Do not delay – drop us a line to find out just how competitive our rates are for a LinkedIn profile makeover.